“Good Business…Bad Business”

Excerpts from the soon to be released book, “Good Business…Bad Business” by Robert Singer and Rick Segel.

Good Business — Good managers check on the progress of assigned tasks
Bad Business — Giving someone a task and not checking-in before completion period

To avoid failure, disappointment, and the risk of running a potentially good employee check on the progress of an assignment or project.  A small correction along the way can avoid a major issue or problem later on.

A slight adjustment can avoid projects going off course and avoid hearing the words, “I thought that was what you wanted.”

By checking-in you can assess the progress and determine if completion will be on a timely basis.

“Good Business…Bad Business”

Excerpts from the soon to be released book, “Good Business…Bad Business” by Robert Singer and Rick Segel.

Good Business — Understand that different people learn in different ways
Bad Business — Not appreciating the other person’s learning style

Everyone learns in a different style.  Some people are auditory or they learn from hearing.  Some are visual learners, while others have to do it themselves known as callisthenic learning.  If someone learns from hearing and you consistently send them emails of tasks to read and perform you are NOT approaching them in the best style for them.

This is an important concept because it applies in so many different parts of a business.  This is for managing, selling, marketing and almost every part of your business that relates to people.  Check your worker’s style before you make a mistake and try to teach someone the wrong way.

“Good Business…Bad Business”

Excerpts from the soon to be released book, “Good Business…Bad Business” by Robert Singer and Rick Segel.

Good Business — Having a meeting “with” an agenda
Bad Business — Having a meeting “without” an agenda

This is as basic as it comes, but has such far reaching effects.  Agendas save time and focus a group on the issues to be discussed.  It also serves as an internal time clock if you know how much time you are working with.  The other issue is that agenda items change therefore we need to make sure everyone is using the same agenda.

Always leave room for new topics, open discussion, or any type of new business.  But leave that till the end to ensure what has to be accomplished is accomplished.

“Good Business . . . Bad Business”

Excerpts from the soon to be released book, “Good Business . . . Bad Business” by Robert Singer and Rick Segel.

Good Business —Doing what you say you are going to do
Bad Business — Making promises that are never kept

This is more common than most of us like to admit. Promises that are not kept can be the start of a cancer in your organization. It creates a loss of confidence and trust.  The boss’ word becomes worthless.

It is a two way street because if an employee doesn’t follow up or fulfill their promises the trust will have been lost. It doesn’t mean that you have to use the words I promise to do that for you if you do this for me. A manager saying they will be in early is a promise.

Un-kept promises lead to distrusting employees and managers. The bottom line is only promise what you can do and don’t make a promise unless you are going to follow through on your commitment.

“Good Business . . . Bad Business”

Excerpts from the soon to be released book, “Good Business . . . Bad Business” by Robert Singer and Rick Segel.

Good Business – Making decisions with enough information to make an intelligent decision.
Bad Business – Making decisions with no information or little information when information is readily available.

The people that drive us crazy the most are those people that make decision, even major decisions, with one piece of information, limited information, or from a single source.  You can even say “hear say” information which is even worse.  We all know the person that has a friend that seems to make all the decisions for them.

The key in decision making is getting the best information, from the best sources, in an understandable and comparison format.  Spreadsheets or brochures that compare products using check marks for capabilities should be used in our decision making process.  The is what “Do Diligence” is all about.

“Good Business . . . Bad Business”

Excerpts from the soon to be released book, “Good Business . . Bad Business” by Robert Singer and Rick Segel.

Good Business — Being liked by everyone
Bad Business — Being liked by everyone

Everyone loves to be popular and loved by everyone BUT that’s just not realistic. Sometimes supervisors try so hard to be liked they lose track of the company’s standards and goals. Face it some people aren’t going to like us and we are going to have to deal with what we refer to as a chemical imbalance. However, disagreeing with employees is NOT a bad thing and can actually force us to examine different ways of doing things.

Through disagreement and different opinions or perspectives can create great results. But never forget that you are the boss and your decision is the final word.

Having said that, being liked is the spoon full of sugar that makes the difficult decisions easier to swallow. So being liked is not a bad thing and should always be cognizant of but not consumed by.

Good Business, Bad Business

Excerpt from the soon to be released book, “Good Business, Bad Business” by Robert Singer and Rick Segel.

Good Business— When Solving problems listen to the frontlines.
Bad Business
—Making decisions from an ivory tower

More companies get into trouble by well-intentioned executives and managers by making decisions on what it should be as opposed to what it really is. As General George Patton once said, “Show me the men on the front lines and I will know how the war is really going.” In other words it’s the front line people that have the most information.

This philosophy is what the hit TV show Undercover Boss is based on. Where the CEO works in disguise as a new employee. Gathering information from all sources and not be so strong willed that you know it all.